SP confirms second case of monkeypox in Brazil, Sao Paulo

SP confirms second case of monkeypox in Brazil, Sao Paulo

The Sao Paulo State Ministry of Health has confirmed a second case of monkeypox in Brazil. This is a 29-year-old man who had travelled to Europe and was quarantined at his home in Vinhedo, inland São Paulo.

The City’s Epidemiological Surveillance Unit works with the State to monitor the cases and their respective contacts.

The case is considered imported because the patient has a history of travel to Portugal and Spain and still has symptoms and first skin lesions in Europe. The positive result was confirmed by a Spanish laboratory only after landing in Brazil on June 8.

The Instituto Adolfo Lutz confirmed the first case of the disease in the country on Thursday (9th). The patient, a 41-year-old man who had travelled to Spain, the country with the second-highest number of cases of the disease, was quarantined at the Emilio Ribas Institute of Infectious Diseases in the western region of the capital. His clinical condition is good.

In a report to TV Globo, the patient said he was fine. “I’ve counted 60 wounds, but I’m doing fine. There’s no reason to panic. I can’t wait to get out of here and go back to work. In fact, I’ve even worked in a hospital.”

All people who have had contact with the patient are being monitored.

“I’m not worried about being seen as the first Brazilian to suffer from monkeypox. I want to be able to show people that I’m fine, that I was and am being cared for by excellent doctors. May the painful time be for Brazilian science to develop for all People provide protection. The best protection is true information. I support science and I accept participation in research,” he said.

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In addition to this case, the city of São Paulo reported that it monitored the health of a 26-year-old woman with no history of travel abroad who was hospitalized with suspicion of contracting the disease. According to Mayor Ricardo Nunes (MDB), the patient is doing well. Family members and people close to her were also monitored by the municipality.

In a note issued on Wednesday (8), the Ministry of Health reported that, Eight cases under investigation nationwide. According to the Ministry of Health, there are 1 suspected case each in Ceara, Mato Grosso do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul and São Paulo, 2 are still being monitored in Rondônia and 2 in Santa Catarina. example.

On Sunday (5), the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that 780 cases of monkeypox have been confirmed worldwide. These data correspond to the time interval between May 13 and June 2, and only consider patients identified in areas where the disease is not endemic. According to the entity, no deaths were reported.

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Monkeypox: Watch 5 points about the disease

Monkeypox: Watch 5 points about the disease

Attention Director of Health

Brazil has detected a second case of monkeypox, the health minister reported. This is a 29-year-old man isolated at his home in Vinhedo, inland São Paulo. Epidemiological surveillance by the municipality works with the state to monitor cases and their respective contacts.

The case is considered imported because the patient has a history of travel to Portugal and Spain and still has symptoms and first skin lesions in Europe. The positive result was confirmed by a Spanish laboratory only after landing in Brazil on June 8.

The country’s first case of the disease was confirmed on Thursday (9). He is a 41-year-old resident of the capital and is currently hospitalized in the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas in good clinical condition.

Since last week, the State Epidemiological Surveillance Center (CVE) and the city of São Paulo have also been investigating another patient, a 26-year-old woman who is also a resident of the capital.

About Monkeypox (Monkeypox)

Monkeypox is a rare viral disease spread through close/close contact with an infected person with skin lesions. For example, this contact can be achieved by hugging, kissing, massaging, sexual intercourse, or prolonged close contact with respiratory secretions. Transmission also occurs through contact with objects, fabrics (clothing, bedding or towels) and surfaces used by the patient. There is no specific treatment, but the general clinical manifestations are mild, requiring care and observation of the lesions.

The first symptoms may be fever, headache, muscle and back pain, swollen lymph nodes, chills or tiredness. 1 to 3 days after the onset of these symptoms, people develop skin lesions that may be located on the hands, mouth, feet, chest, face, and/or genital areas.

– Avoid close/intimate contact with the patient until all wounds have healed;

– Avoid contact with any material used by the sick person, such as bedding.

– Hand hygiene, wash with soap and water and/or use alcohol gel.

The WHO said monkeypox posed a “moderate risk” to global public health after cases were reported in countries where the disease was not endemic.

“The risk to public health could become high if this virus establishes as a human pathogen and spreads to groups more likely to be at risk of severe disease, such as young children and immunosuppressed populations,” WHO said.

The group said it did not recommend a smallpox vaccine for monkeypox cases.

Microscope image showing monkeypox virus — Photo: Cynthia S. Goldsmith, Russell Regner/CDC via AP

The first symptoms of monkeypox are usually fever, headache, muscle aches, back pain, swollen glands (lymph nodes), chills, and exhaustion.

“After the incubation period [tempo entre a infecção e o início dos sintomas]individuals begin with nonspecific manifestations, Symptoms we see in other viruses: fever, malaise, fatigue, loss of appetite, collapse”, explains Giliane Trindade, virologist and researcher at the Department of Microbiology, Federal University of Minas Gerais (UFMG).

Within 1 to 3 days (and sometimes longer) after a fever, people develop a rash that usually starts on the face and spreads to other parts of the body.

“What is an indicative difference: the development of lesions – lesions on the mouth and on the skin. They start on the face first and then spread to the torso, chest, palms, soles of feet.”, added Trindade, who is an adviser to a group created by the Ministry of Science, Technology and Innovation to monitor smallpox cases in monkeys.

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